There is an ocean of calm, your true nature, indestructible

Underneath your pain, your sorrow, your anger, your frustration, your bliss, your joy, your boredom, underneath every thought and emotion, both positive and negative, both sacred and profane, there is an ocean of calm, your true nature, indestructible, ever-present, free.

— Jeff Foster

To expect truth to come from thinking signifies that we mistake the need to think with the urge to know.

To expect truth to come from thinking signifies that we mistake the need to think with the urge to know. Thinking can and must be employed in the attempt to know, but in the exercise of this function it is never itself; it is but the handmaiden of an altogether different enterprise.

~ Hannah Arendt, The Life of the Mind

February 23. Six Inches of New Snow.

Some bird with feet the approximate gauge of an H.O. train has laid a wavy track along the side of the house, tooting the while, or so I’d guess, and at the front porch door a mouse has left its busy back-and-forth and then dithered away. Crossing the yard, a rabbit has hopped from one side of its course to the other and back, as rabbits will, avoiding the land mines. And each of our dogs, always the ones for a touch of sentiment, stepped out at dawn to leave a yellow peony.

Ted Kooser. February 23. Six Inches of New Snow. Winter Morning Walks: One Hundred Postcards to Jim Harrison (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2000)

Still as fence posts they wait, dark and reproachful

In fair weather,
the shy past keeps its distance.
Old loves, old regrets, old humiliations
look on from afar.
They stand back under the trees.
No one would think
to look for them there.  

But in the fog they come closer.
You can feel them there
by the road as you slowly walk past.
Still as fence posts they wait,
dark and reproachful,
each stepping forward in turn.

Ted Kooser. February 16. An early morning fog. Winter Morning Walks: One Hundred Postcards to Jim Harrison (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2000)